Little Red Hen

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The Princess’ teacher sent home an update on what they are learning about at school.  Counting and estimating for math, how vegetables grow for science and they are reading “The Little Red Hen” and have begun their reading journals for English.  As an avid reader, I always told myself that when I had children I would read whatever my children were reading in school so that I would be able to carry on education at home.  I’m a firm believer that in order for your child to excel at school, you have to carry that on at home too.  I try to mix fun with learning and I’m excited to read Little Red Hen with my Princess.  The Princess has numerous books and we are fortunate to have not one, but three copies of this story.

Basically the gist of the story is Little Red Hen plants wheat, harvests is, mills it and bakes it into bread with no help from any of her barnyard friends.  However, once the bread is baked, all the friends want a bite, but the Little Red Hen says no as she is the only one who did all the work.  The moral of the story is that people who don’t want to contribute to the project, do not get to reap the benefits of the end product.

Originally a Russian old folk tale, the Little Red Hen had its role in reading instruction.  In the late 1800’s, there was a shift from religious texts to texts that still portrayed clear morals with less religious content.  Also with its repetitive vocabulary, it is still is reading technique used for reading beginners.

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