Tag Archives: diapers

Frugal Friday – Save Money on Diapers

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I’m always keeping an eye out for ways to save money now that I’m on maternity leave.  I wrote a post on saving money when buying baby stuff and in this post I will be dealing directly with diapers.  Since our Rainbow has come home, he has surprised and impressed us with his ability to fill copious amounts of diapers.  Hubby and I stocked up on diapers when we could prior to his birth but we have already had to do a few diaper runs.  Being a big boy, he outgrew the newborn size within a first few days leaving us with 2 packs we never even opened.  So here are a few ways to save money on diapers and it doesn’t involve changing them less.

  • Store Brands.  Some people swear buy them or curse them, but store brands are generally less expensive and do go on sale periodically like brand name diapers.
  • Coupons.  I am a fan of these and I have a few selected sites that sends me high value coupons to my favourite brands.
  • Reward Programs.  Pampers and Huggies both offer rewards programs and will occasionally send you free samples in the mail.
  • In Store Promotions.  Right now, Shopper’s  Drugmart has a promotion going on with diapers where there is a $4 off coupon attached to each diaper product.  They also have a Optimum Points and V.I.B. program and for simply signing up, I received 2 full packs of diapers as well as high value optimum point coupons.

I didn’t include cloth diapers as I don’t use them and I’m not fully aware of the cost effectiveness on them.  I have friends who swear by them however, so I’d welcome any input on cloth 🙂

Parenting Is Hard Enough

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I was recently having a discussion about Alicia Silverstone pre-chewing her food and feeding her son.  Then we discussed the whole “co-sleeping” debate when Mayim Bialik wrote about attachment parenting.  Everyone had an opinion on what was the right and wrong way to parent.  I remember getting all sorts of parenting advice, whether it was warranted or not, and there were days where my brain actually hurt.

Should I breastfeed?  What about formula?  How long should the baby sleep in our room?  Should we use a stroller or baby carrier?  There was so much to think about and we were getting advice at every corner.  All I wanted was to raise a well-rounded, polite, out going child.  That’s not too much to ask is it?  I asked the likely people for advice, my doctor, my mom and mother in-law, friends with children and did my own research on the internet.  Then I would get it from people on the street.  I didn’t even ask them for their opinion, I merely passed them on the street.  What the heck?

Now that I am a mother and many of my friends are having children, sometimes they come to me for advice.  I do what I did.  I went to my own mother, my mother in-law, ask my doctor and did my own research.  At then at the end, I did what I thought was best for my daughter.  And that was all they could do.  I told them I was not about to be an insufferable know-it-all and tell them every last detail of my parenting experience and that ultimately, they would do what they thought was best for their children.   Do not listen to all the chatter, use your natural instinct and your child will turn out alright.

Historically speaking, women came together and birthed and raised children as a community.  Now it is more of an attack on parenting.  We are judging each other instead of helping each other.  Good grief, parenting is hard enough without everyone and their neighbour chipping in their two cents.  So what if you co-sleep?  If it works for you, then by all means.  Pre-chew food?  Not my first choice, but then again, it’s not my child.  Parenting is as deeply personal as religion is.  It varies from person to person and if we are not supposed to judge people on their beliefs, then lets not judge them on how they raise their children.  What works for them, may not work for you or I, but it works for them.

I am quite proud of how I raised my daughter.  I gave birth via c-section with an epidural.  I breastfed until she was 5 1/2 months.  She wore disposable diapers as opposed to cloth.  She was in her own crib, in her own room at 2 months.  I immunized her, but didn’t opt for the flu shot.  I never put her in a playpen to play.  I took away her soother at 6 months, and stopped bottle feeding at 14 months. I made my own baby food in the beginning then switched to jarred.  I give her allowance, as I make her do chores.  She gets put in timeout.  She has pets, and reads the Goosebump series.  I didn’t give her juice until she was 20 months old and only because she contracted Norwalk Virus.  Her “security blanket” is actually my old bra (she has been dragging it around since she could crawl, and actually hides all my bras on me now.  I will find them in toy box and under her pillow from time to time.)  I stayed home until she was 18 months and then went back to work full time and put her in daycare.  I will not pierce her ears until she is 5.  She has had overnight sleepover at a friend’s homes.  She still has naps and enjoys morning cartoons.  And while some people may not agree with some of this, it doesn’t matter to me.  My daughter is an independent, intelligent, creative and imaginative little girl.  She says please and thank you, she gives hugs and kisses, shares and plays well with other children.  Only I know what is best for her, as she came from my body. 

My Battle with Potty Training

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When I became pregnant with my daughter, I began to think of all the milestones she would go through, all the trials and tribulations my husband and I would experience, all the sweat, tears, and skinned knees.  I thought about her eating solids, learning to say “mama”, learning how to crawl, walk, and run, but potty training never really crossed my mind.  Perhaps it was the fact my mother had always said how easy I was to train (18 months and no accidents at night by 2) that I thought that of all the stuff she would need to learn, potty training would be a breeze.  I thought wrong!

This momma's fail at potty training

Around 18 months, I began looking online for tips and tidbits, when to start, what signs to look for, so on and so forth.  My daughter didn’t really show any signs except needing to be in the washroom with me when I went.  I allowed it, thinking to myself, “It’ll start this way and soon enough I’ll be diaper free!”  From the things I read online, I was to allow her to pick out her own potty, underwear, toilet insert and stool.  I started off with the potty.  Princess pink and brand new, I thought she would love it.  I put it in the bathroom and held her hand as I showed her.  She stared blankly and looked up at me for some kind of direction.  I explained that she was getting too big for diapers and soon she would go potty.  She was having none of it.  She picked up the potty, looked it over and then much to my chargin,  placed it on her head and danced around the living room.  Let’s put it this way, that was the most use that potty ever saw.  I tried sitting her on it, and the wails and screams that came out of her would rival those of the shrieks from the damned damsel in distress in horror films.  She was not ready.  So I went to the book store and picked up potty books for girls and a potty book for me.  I was realizing quickly that I was in over my head.

By age two, I was no closer to potty training my daughter than I was to winning the Pulitzer or an Oscar.  I took her to buy her own underwear which she loved, but whenever I put them on her, she would use them the same as her diapers, go in them and demand I clean her.  I was discouraged but I still thought 2 was still young enough to be wearing diapers and I was sure that she would get it soon.  I was still looking for these supposed clues to her readiness and there were none.  I gave potty training a break for a little while, hoping that my daughter would come to it on her own in her own time.  I read online that pushing it can set you back and I was definitely not up for that.  By 30 months I consulted her doctor.  He laughed and said these words to me; “Potty training is like a fine wine, you can’t rush it.”  Well thanks doc,  I don’t even like wine.  Shortly after that, we took our daughter once more on a shopping trip to pick out a toilet insert and stool.  She refused the potty with gusto so maybe the toilet would work better.  She sat on it but still would not go.  Eventually she only wanted the stool, using the insert as a frisbee. 

When her third birthday rolled around, I had enough of diapers.  I was beginning to think I would be sending her off to university in diapers.  I made the decision that I was purchasing Pull Ups.  I was told by many people the pro’s and con’s of pull ups; the look and feel like underwear, but still diaper-like.  Cheaper than diapers, but children would get confused.  Regardless, they seemed to work.  I explained that these were not diapers but the next step.  Her daycare even agreed to let her wear them if she wore underwear on top.  It seemed like it was going to finally work when we hit a streak of my daughter’s sheer stubborness.  She flat out refused to use the potty to the point where she would hold it almost to the point of doctor visits.  I even created a potty chart but that lost its appeal when we gave stickers instead of some toy or treat.   I spoke with a friend of mine to share my frustrations, who also works as a psychologist.  She told me the importance of what potty training means to children.  To adults, its just a function we all do, to children, it is the first thing they can give their parents, and a struggle for independance.  She suggested I tell my daughter that her poo was flower food and that it would nourish the flowers.  It seemed to work.  She still struggled with number 2, but she would occassionally go pee.  I bought a toy potty for her dolls and that only turned out to be a waste of money.

Now of all the books, underwear, potties, etc that I have spent my hard earned money on to get her to go to the bathroom didn’t help me get any closer to my diaper free goal, so I picked up Hello Kitty antibacterial handwash at the store for her to use.  I told her that she gets to use it after she uses the potty.   Needless to say, that $2.67 bottle of commercialized, run of the mill, soap in a flashy bottle was enough to change my daughter’s mind.  Since I bought it, she’s only had 2 accidents.  We are starting underwear only next week at daycare and she continues to wear pull ups at night, but it looks as though she will be potty trained, hopefully, finger’s crossed by the summer.  I have to say I have learned my lesson about making assumptions about parenting, because potty training has been one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to do.